The girl with the global closet

Sanam Sippy, JSM Corp, General Manager, Marketing

When we meet at California Pizza Kitchen, Sanam Sippy was dressed simply – in a pair of jeans and shirt, sans make-up. The NYU grad was quite the opposite living in Manhattan for 7 years. “People there would dress up for an 8 am class,” she says. Otherwise going out to clubs, dinners etc also gave ample opportunity to play dress-up. “Since I moved to Bombay I started dressing down completely,” she says. So now at work, the only touch of that fashionista one gets to see on her is a cool leopard print umbrella.

Black dress with gold detailing, Stradivarius

Black dress with gold detailing, Stradivarius

As the general manager marketing for JSM corp that has restaurants and bars such as Shiro, Hard Rock Café, California Pizza Kitchen etc in its repertoire, Sanam is mostly dressed in long sleeved shirts, pants and high heels. She calls her style ‘conservative posh’ – day-wear is jeans and dresses are for dress-up. “I am not experimental,” she says.

Purchased in 2012

Purchased in 2012

Dressing-up all the time in NYC also meant shopping almost daily. “When Gilt had their flash sales or after I walked out of work, I would just go shop.” Now a trip abroad every quarter takes care of her shopping cravings – Alice+Olivia, Elizabeth and James and Elie Tahari are favourites. In Mumbai, she rarely buys clothes and when she does she picks western clothes by Indian designers for the attention they get her abroad.

But for the amount she shops, she confesses she has not discarded anything in the last six years! “Space hasn’t been an issue for me. My mum’s brother lives in NYC so I left my clothes there when I was moving. Otherwise I have a closet in Dubai also, where my parents live,” she says. The fact that her size hasn’t changed, helps her hang on to clothes in the hope of wearing them again. “And I do get emotionally attached to my clothes,” she says.

Number of times worn: 1

Number of times worn: 1

Sanam purchased the black and gold dress from Stradivarius. “I bought it because I was in Singapore – you go there and you just go crazy shopping,” she says. But after wearing it out once, it went back into her Mumbai closet. But this time she decided to part with something for the first time for Fuffabulous!

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The dress is perfect for a UK size 6-8. A lace jacket gives the dress a more soft and vintage-y look.

Model friend: Priya Pereira Chhabria; Styling: Rachana Nakra and Radhika Dhawan; Accessories: Stylist’s own; Photographs: Anand Wahane; Location: Kala Ghoda, Mumbai

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The monk who sold her wardrobe

Interview with Arpan Gauchan, associate producer at Future East Films

Arpan Gauchan doesn’t believe in attachments, to material things. Whether it’s the daily yoga and meditation class she goes for that are an influence, or whether it is her nature she isn’t sure. But if anyone were to point out to a thing she owns and ask for it, she wouldn’t hesitate in giving it away. Which is why she also clears her wardrobe regularly every month, with her friends as beneficiaries.

u-and-down emline skirt, forever 21; black layered top wit old detailin, express

Up-and-down hemline geometric pattern skirt, Forever 21; Black layered top wit gold detailing, Express

In keeping with her calm, easy going personality, her style is also comfortable-boho with a touch of hippie. Dressed in long flowing dresses, long skirts, and lose pants all in natural fabrics, with no accessories – she is the kind of person who makes you wonder why you pulled on a pair of skinny jeans when you could be dressed in a breathable cotton Ikat dress.

“The way I dress also has a lot to do with the weather in Mumbai,” she adds. For evenings out, while the basic look remains he same, the quality and labels of the clothes improves and flats are replaced with boots or heels.

number of times worn: skirt - 0; top - 2

Number of times worn: skirt – 0; top – 2

Arpan bought the skirt with the up-and-down hemline while shopping at Forever 21 in New Delhi last year. “Actually my friend suggested I buy this, and I did without thinking or even trying it on,” she says. Later she realised the skirt is “just not her style” and never did end up wearing it. The top was also purchased on a trip to USA and she wore it a couple of times before she lost weight (all that yoga) and couldn’t fit into it any more. “I still love it though.” But it wasn’t difficult for her at all, to give away these clothes to Fuffabulous. Detachment from the material world as they say, does make life easier.

P1100819 (1)The skirt is perfect for a UK size 8-10, while the top fits a UK size 8.

Model friend: Kadambari Sadekar; Photos and styling: Rachana Nakra; Accessories: Stylist’s own

Beauty-cool: Product pick

Since I discovered this product, I haven’t stopped raving about it. As someone with wavy-curly hair living in Mumbai, frizz has been a lifelong frenemy. I have been duped of a lot of cash trying various products that promised to get frizz out of my life. Until one day, on a stroll down Oxford Street that led to an evening spent dipping into magical pots and tubes through the beauty level at the Liberty department store – that’s when I was introduced to Aveda and my life…. ok well, my hair was never the same again.

Presenting to all you girls who have to deal with high-maintenance curly hair in humid cities – you will write in thanking me for this.

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The Aveda ‘Be Curly’ range

I use the Style Prep and Curl Enhancer after washing my hair and the frizz is tamed almost completely while the curls get instant definition. I realised the impact when my friends immediately noticed the change.

Aveda1The products are not available in India yet, but take a look at the website to find out where you can purchase them on your next trip abroad www.aveda.com.

Warning: You will be sucked in for a while, so if you are at work, make sure your boss isn’t around.

Anything could happen

Not only because I’m listening to Ellie Goulding as I type this.

My experience with fuffa:

I recently got back home from London, after more than a year spent studying, travelling, making friends, shopping and receiving a Masters in Fashion Management. Many of you might be familiar with that particular brand of feeling when you come back home after a stint abroad – the confusion, the vacuum.

But then that’s the only downside to going to London. As a resident of the fashion capital of the world, I learnt more about fashion in a year spent shopping and people watching on Oxford Street, trekking to Bricklane market over weekends, visiting pop-up stores in Shoreditch, working at Paul & Joe on Sloane Street and reading my free copy of Stylist magazine on the tube, than I did in the same time spent as a fashion journalist here.

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Pop-up mall at Shoreditch

Wait, there was another downside. You shop so much that when you start packing up your life in two suitcases and a cabin bag, you realise you will be leaving behind more than just your friends.

My wardrobe had to be culled, and mercilessly. I had to choose only the clothes I couldn’t absolutely do without. And if you have been in this position, you know how hard it is to even leave your favourite cosy bathrobe behind. But I was brutal. The bathrobe went and along with it many of my favourite clothes and boots – clothes I hadn’t had enough of a chance to wear, and really, how often can you wear boots in Mumbai? (Unless you are an actor, then you wear boots and leather jackets everywhere.)

I made two piles. One went to Oxfam. The other pile became a party invitation – eat, drink and try on clothes. And when I saw my friends twirl in the dresses and coats and fall in love with them, it was all fine. I was leaving behind my clothes with my friends.